Philanthropy Archives


Mss 49
60 c.f (25 cartons, 50 document boxes, 20 flat boxes, 1 videocassette)
[Printer-friendly version]

ABSTRACT

The Indianapolis Foundation was created in 1916 by the resolution of three financial institutions, the Fletcher Trust Company, Indiana Trust Company, and Union Trust Company. It was officially introduced as one of the first community foundations in the United States in the January 5, 1916, edition of the Indianapolis Star. According to the resolution, income from the Indianapolis Foundation would "be dispersed by said companies on the written order of a board of trustees for such charitable uses as well in its judgment promote the welfare of persons now or hereafter residing in Indianapolis, Indiana." The foundation began making grants in 1924 and today continues to give to Indianapolis organizations to help improve the quality of life in the city.

ACCESS

Last updated by bburk on 07/15/2013

Mss 046
43.0 c.f (39 cartons, 6 cassette boxes, 13 films, 4 videos)
[Printer-friendly version]

ABSTRACT

Independent Sector (IS) was founded in 1980 as a coalition of corporate, foundation and voluntary organizations for the purpose of encouraging charitable giving, volunteering and nonprofit activities in the United States. Its mission is to promote, strengthen, and advance the nonprofit and philanthropic community to foster private initiative for the public good. By 2004, the organization maintained a membership of approximately 500 of the nation's leading nonprofit agencies and funders of nonprofit work.

The collection consists of board minutes, committee reports, correspondence, publications, lobbying efforts, and conference materials.

ACCESS

This collection is open to the public without restriction. The copyright law of the United States (Title 17, United States Code) governs the making of photocopies or other reproductions of copyrighted material.

Last updated by bburk on 07/15/2013

Mss 001
15.0 c.f. (15 cartons)

 


ABSTRACT

Last updated by bburk on 02/28/2009

Mss 034
1.8 c.f (1 carton and 2 document boxes)

ABSTRACT

Last updated by bburk on 02/28/2009

Mss 004
3.2 c.f. (2 cartons, 7 flat boxes)
[Printer-friendly version]

ABSTRACT

Flanner House, a social service center for the Indianapolis, Indiana African-American community, promotes the social, moral, and physical welfare of African-Americans, particularly youth. It was established in 1903 by Frank Flanner, a local mortician, under the name of Flanner Guild and was the first settlement house for African-Americans in the city. Programs and activities have included a day nursery, training for men and women, self-help projects such as housing construction, and public health programs including preventive medicine. Its current mission offers area residents a variety of direct and decentralized social services, child care, youth and senior citizen programs, and cultural and recreational activities.

Last updated by bburk on 09/07/2011

Mss 006
22.4 c.f (22 cartons and 1 document box)
[Printer-friendly version]

ABSTRACT

Carol Bernstein Ferry and the late W. H. (Ping) Ferry were social change philanthropists who gave away a substantial part of their personal wealth to progressive social change groups, activities, and activists concentrating generally in the areas of war, racism, poverty, and injustice. The Ferrys were also board members of the DJB Foundation, established by Carol's first husband, Daniel J. Bernstein, which focused its giving in similar areas.

The papers, 1971-1996, document the individuals, organizations, and activities the Ferrys supported with their donations.

ACCESS

This collection is open to the public without restriction. The copyright law of the United States (Title 17, United States Code) governs the making of photocopies or other reproductions of copyrighted material.

Last updated by bburk on 07/05/2010

Mss 10
10.5 c.f (21 document boxes)
[Printer-friendly version]

ABSTRACT

The DJB Foundation, a progressive social change philanthropy, was founded in 1948 by Daniel J. Bernstein to hold the portion of his inheritance intended for donation to charities. With his death in 1970 almost five-million dollars came to the foundation. Its most active period began in 1971 when the Board of Directors decided that all assets would be given away within ten years. The grants concentrated on groups and programs generally ignored by conventional foundations because they were "controversial" -- the poor, GIs, deserters and draft resisters, ethnic groups, convicts and ex-convicts. The DJB Foundation exhausted its funds by the end of 1974.

The DJB Foundation Records consist of financial summaries and grant files containing correspondence, proposals, and information about the recipient organization.

Last updated by bburk on 06/29/2010

Mss 002
43.0 c.f (39 cartons, 4 cassette boxes, 2 flat boxes, 13 video cassettes, and 64 audio cassettes)
[Printer-friendly version]

ABSTRACT

The Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) is an organization formed by the 1975 merger of the American Alumni Council (AAC) and the American College Public Relations Association (ACPRA). Constituents of both groups believed their goal of increasing the professional competence of those individuals involved in all phases of alumni work including, alumni administration, educational fund raising, public relations and publications in order to promote the cause of education could be better achieved as a single entity.

The collection contains the records of CASE and its predecessor institutions covering the development of the early organizations and their merger to form the Council for Advancement and Support of Education.

ACCESS

Last updated by bburk on 07/15/2013

Mss 24
5.0 c.f (5 cartons)
[Printer-friendly version]

ABSTRACT

The Commission on Private Philanthropy and Public Needs was founded in November 1973 through the efforts of John D. Rockefeller, III, House Ways and Means Chairman Wilbur D. Mills, Secretary of the Treasury George P. Shultz, and Under Secretary William E. Simon. The Commission was formed to study the role of philanthropic giving in the United States and to make recommendations regarding ways to strengthen and increase the effectiveness of the voluntary sector. Composed of religious and labor leaders, former cabinet members, executives of foundations and corporations, federal judges, and representatives of several minority groups, the Commission sought to reach its goal through research and debate. The findings and recommendations of the Commission were published in a final report entitled, Giving in America: Toward a Stronger Voluntary Sector.

Last updated by bburk on 07/15/2013

Mss 23
6.4 c.f. (6 cartons, 1 pamphlet box, 1 cassette box)
[Printer-friendly version]

ABSTRACT

The Commission on Foundations and Private Philanthropy was formed by John D. Rockefeller, III, in 1969, and chaired by Peter Peterson, to objectively investigate foundations and their role in society. The Peterson Commission, as it was known, was designed to be influenced by neither the government nor the foundations they investigated. An objective appraisal of foundation activities was necessary to give the Commission the credibility it needed to influence Congress' decisions on foundation activities. By researching the roles of foundations in society, the members hoped to construct policy recommendations that made foundations more accountable while allowing them to maintain their independence from outside interference.

Last updated by bburk on 07/15/2013