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Resources

The library should provide varied, authoritative and up-to-date resources that support its mission and the needs of its users. Resources may be provided onsite or from remote storage locations, on the main campus or at off-campus locations. Moreover, resources may be in a variety of formats, including print or hard copy, online electronic text or images, and other media. Within budget constraints, the library should provide quality resources in the most efficient manner possible. Collection currency and vitality should be maintained through judicious weeding.

  1. What criteria are used to make decisions about the acquisition, retention, and use of print, electronic, and media resources? How does the library select resources for its users?
  2. What is the role of the classroom faculty in the selection of library resources and in the ongoing development and evaluation of the collection?
  3. Does the library have a continuing and effective program to evaluate its collections, resources and online databases, both quantitatively and qualitatively?
  4. Do print, media, and electronic resources reflect campus curricular and research needs?
  5. Does the library have sufficient user licenses for its electronic resources so that on-site and remote users can be accommodated?
  6. How are consortium purchasing and licensing agreements utilized?
  7. If the library has responsibility for collecting and maintaining the college archives, how does it address these responsibilities?
  8. How do the library's collections and online databases compare with its peers?
  9. Does the library maintain the currency of the collection through a judicious weeding program?

1. What criteria are used to make decisions about the acquisition, retention, and use of print, electronic, and media resources? How does the library select resources for its users?

The IUPUI University Library has a draft general collection development policy. There are also a number of individual policies related to specific formats and subject areas such as: electronic resources, reference, rare books, Philanthropic Studies Library, education, social work, etc.

Resources are selected through a variety of means including:

a) faculty or student requests

b) approval plan profiles

c) Choice cards

d) librarian selection from vendor book notices on forms or publishers' catalogs.

2. What is the role of the classroom faculty in the selection of library resources and in the ongoing development and evaluation of the collection?

The level of classroom faculty involvement varies. Faculty in the various schools or departments were consulted on the development of approval plan profiles for their units. Generally a librarian liaison to an academic unit at the school or department level has a counterpart in that academic unit with whom they have primarily contact concerning library orders and other library issues. Requests for purchases are passed from the faculty member to the librarian. Some academic units are more pro-active than others. Faculty requests are generally considered high priorities for purchasing. Faculty are often asked to help review journal selections in their subject areas.

Some schools have library committees to discuss issues related to library resources and services, e.g., the Schools of Liberal Arts and Science. Most schools play a very active role in selection and deselection of journals.

3. Does the library have a continuing and effective program to evaluate its collections, resources and online databases, both quantitatively and qualitatively?

Other than electronic resources, the library does not currently have an overall evaluative process for its collections. Electronic resources are reviewed annually by all librarians as a whole. Individual areas of the collection are evaluated in association with program reviews and various accreditation processes for academic programs. The on-going collection of use statistics for journals is partially employed as a criteria when reviewing possible journal cancellations.

4. Do print, media, and electronic resources reflect campus curricular and research needs?
We have several approval plans carefully defined with input from the faculty and with focus on curriculum and research needs. An internal study done several years ago did show that the approval plan books were more frequently signed out than other titles cataloged within the same time period. The librarian liaisons make every attempt to maintain close contact with the academic units in order to meet the needs of the curriculum and research within budgetary restraints. Purchases are made to meet the format needs of the curriculum provided that format meets normal industry standards and licensing requirements.
5. Does the library have sufficient user licenses for its electronic resources so that on-site and remote users can be accommodated?
Yes, we do. The number of simultaneous users are updated according to available usage statistics and funding. This issue is reviewed annually at the electronic resources meeting.
6. How are consortium purchasing and licensing agreements utilized?
We use consortium agreements to get discounts on subscription prices and/or access to resources otherwise unaffordable. We have agreements with INCOLSA (Indiana's statewide library network), Indianapolis-Marion County Public Library, Indiana University Library System, and other libraries on our campus (Medical School Library and Law Library).
7. If the library has responsibility for collecting and maintaining the college archives, how does it address these responsibilities?
The University archives is a section within the Special Collections Team. The Web site for the University archives contains information on its policy and mission, as well as procedural issues.
8. How do the library's collections and online databases compare with its peers?
IUPUI's five libraries contain 1,307,346 print volumes (monographs, bound journals). This figure compares with a total of 6,384,711 volumes kept on IU's Bloomington campus - all of which are available to IUPUI students and faculty, either through direct borrowing or inter-library loan. IUPUI's campus collections, however, are growing at an annual rate of 19.8%, almost double the IU-B rate of 10.3% per year [Source: Indiana University Fact Book: 2000-2001].

IUPUI's 1.3 million volumes are 83.4% of the total of the average volume holdings (1,566,860 volumes) of a group of peer institution library holdings. This list of peer libraries consists of the libraries of the University of Alabama-Birmingham, the University of Illinois-Chicago, the University of Massachusetts-Boston, the University of Missouri-Kansas City, and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee [Source: American Library Directory: 2002-2003].

In a 1998 study, the University Library at IUPUI compared IUPUI's print collections discipline by discipline with the collections of the five peer libraries listed above. This study was conducted by doing identical subject searches in the online catalogs of IUPUI and the five peer libraries. The results showed that IUPUI's collection surpassed the average of our peers in five discipline areas: Tourism Management (370%), Philanthropic Studies (230%), Nursing (199%), Social Work (174%), and Journalism (102%). The disciplines where IUPUI's print holdings were weakest were Music (12% of the peer average), Classical Studies (33%), English (34%), Art (45%), and Biology (46%). Twenty-seven other disciplines ranged from 49% to 98% of the average of the peer libraries [Source: "University Library at IUPUI: Library Holdings - A Comparison with Peer Institutions - 1998" ].

The materials budget had no increase in 2002/03, and this puts our collections at risk. Among the major concerns are the support for science and engineering / technology. Based on the materials budget received, inflation of published materials, and our taxation formula, science had to cut approximately $84,000 in 2002/03. Engineering / technology reduced their serial purchases by $22,000 in 2002/03.

Although libraries nationally have not developed a satisfactory method for comparing electronic - as opposed to print - holdings, the IUPUI libraries are without doubt leaders in the number and variety of databases offered to students and faculty. IUPUI offers Gale/Infotrac's Expanded Academic ASAP as well as Ebsco's Academic Search Premier (plus nineteen other Ebsco databases). In addition to these large journal content databases, IUPUI offers a full set of OVID databases (for medical, nursing, and health research) plus a wide variety of online discipline-based indexes and abstracting services, among them Chemical Abstracts (through SciFinder Scholar), ERIC E-Subscribe (for Education), Historical Abstracts, Social Work Abstracts, and the Modern Language Association Bibliography).

IUPUI students and faculty now have access to the electronic full-text contents of approximately 10,000 journals, compared to just over 4,500 print subscriptions currently received by IUPUI University Library. In addition to this growing electronic journal collection, University Library currently holds authorized access to over 5,000 electronic books, all available through IUCAT, the IU Libraries' online catalog.

9. Does the library maintain the currency of the collection through a judicious weeding program?
The library does not currently have a systematic weeding program. Individual areas are weeded by subject librarians as special projects.
Last updated by lcalvert on 08/03/2007